--------------

RUNNER'S NICHE

--------------

Vol. 1 No. 7 October, 1996

*********************

NOTES FROM THE EDITOR

*********************

RUNNER'S NICHE continues to get new subscribers from far and wide.

We have a good number of European subscribers, several from South

America and Africa, New Zealand and Australia are represented, we

even have a subscriber from Singapore.

What is becoming more and more clear as I get comments from our

subscribers, is that there are as many reasons to run as there are

runners. We have elite racers, novices, young and old represented in

our subscribership. Some folks want more training articles, others

want more news, and others would prefer more anecdotes from

individual runners.

RUNNER'S NICHE will continue to try to print a wide variety of

articles, and we hope there is something for everyone. This month,

though, I'd like to draw your attention to an article written for us by

a high school runner. It is the shortest article we have ever printed,

and yet I think it says a great deal to anyone who runs. I know it

was refreshing for this old runner, perhaps a bit jaded and worn out,

to read this refreshing piece. If you read nothing else this month,

please make sure to read "Why I Run" by Alison Powell.

*********

Why I Run

*********

By Alison Powell

Northwest High School, Ohio

I'm a high school Junior and I started running 5 years ago. When I

first started running, I thought I was crazy and so did my friends,but

for some reason I was drawn to it. So I stuck with it and that's how

things are. I run both Cross Country and Track, both are demanding

sports. I still ask myself why I do it and deep down I know the

answer. I love running. I love blisters, cramps, pain, heat, spikes,

long bus rides, flooded courses, and everything about being a runner.

The pride lasts longer than the pain and I have EVERYTHING to gain.

********************

BLAST FROM THE PAST:

********************

*1988 FALMOUTH ROAD RACE*

By Woody Green

Falmouth. The name means a traditional rolling 7.1 mile race to

runners. It is only incidentally the name of the Cape Cod town in

which the race is run. Always featuring top world class runners, the

race has a long tradition of excellence. 1988's race featured a

$70,000 purse and top runners such as Wilson Waigwa, Mark Curp,

Steve Jones, Keith Brantly, Steve Spence, Anne Hannam, Joan

Samuelson, Judy Chamberlin, Betty Geiger, and Nancy Tinari.

There were some odd twists to this year's race before it even started.

Joan Samuelson, taking a boat to the event, nearly missed the start

when the captain was headed to the wrong port. A course correction

was made and she made it to the starting minutes before the race.

Several top runners were left well back of the starting line when the

starter fired the gun 5 minutes early, thus Wilson Waigwa and Judy

Chamberlin were out of the race from the start.

The women's race saw up and coming New Zealander Anne Hannam

take the lead early and lead virtually the whole race. Betty Geiger

made a late surge and caught her, but then she misjudged the finish.

Hannam then pulled away for the win. Her time of 36:36 was the

forth fastest in Falmouth history. Samuelson, who owned the three

fastest times on the course, could manage only forth on this day.

The men's race featured mid-race surge by Curp, who pulled away

from a group of four top runners. He managed to lead to the finish, in

32:22. Steve Spence, who had been in many show downs recently

with Curp, lost this one, getting second in 32:27.

 

**************************

THE REAL OLYMPIC COVERAGE?

**************************

The following was plagiarized from the internet by contributor

Andrew Crook. We thought you might get a chuckle...

ATLANTA (KRT) -- And now for NBC's impression of the Olympics on

TV:

TRUMPETS: BOM! BOM! BOM-BOM BOM BOM BOM!

BOB COSTAS: Good evening, and as you can tell by the sound of the

Olympic

Theme Song that we play almost as much as we show Kerri Strug's

historic

vault, it's time for our broadcast of The Recently Videotaped Olympic

Games

Featuring Americans. We're going to start by taking you right to the

track-and-field stadium, where the men's 100-meter dash is about to

get under

way, despite the fact that it actually happened four hours ago.

TRACK COMMENTATOR: Bob, this promises to be an exciting race,

featuring

Americans.

COSTAS: And what are the obstacles that these Americans have

overcome to

create a Human Interest Factor for our broadcast?

TRACK COMMENTATOR: Bob, from left to right, they have overcome

psoriasis,

vertigo and a bad allergy to vinaigrette dressing.

COSTAS: We'll come back to the men's 100-meter final, but right now

we're

going to replay the video of Kerri Strug, an American, overcoming

her ankle

to make her courageous vault.

(Kerri Strug vaults.)

COSTAS: What a human moment! Time for a commercial.

ANNOUNCER: We're IBM. We're a giant corporation with vast

computer expertise.

That's why we're in charge of keeping track of all the statistics for

these,

the Olympic Games of 1953. Thank you.

BOM! BOM! BOMBOM BOM BOM BOM!

COSTAS: Now we're going to take you to women's beach volleyball,

where the

sun is shining brightly despite the fact that it is now 10:37 p.m. on

the

East Coast.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL COMMENTATOR: Thanks, Bob. This is Holly

McPeak, an American,

and as you can see in this digitized, computer-enhanced, ultra-slow-

motion

Beach Cam closeup shot, she has overcome cellulite.

COSTAS: I'll say. When is she going to serve?

BEACH VOLLEYBALL COMMENTATOR: She'll be serving in about 4

seconds, Bob.

COSTAS: I'm sorry, but we don't have that kind of time, because we

need to

show this Heartwarming Moment.

(Kerri Strug vaults.)

COSTAS: Now let's go out to the cycling competition, where I believe

we have

a race involving an American.

CYCLING COMMENTATOR: That is correct, Bob. We have an American

shown here

pedaling furiously in 637th place, with a solid chance to move up to

636th.

COSTAS: What obstacle has this American overcome?

CYCLING COMMENTATOR: Bob, he is overcoming one hellacious case

of

hemorrhoids.

COSTAS: We'll have more on that exciting cycling race, but right now

we're

going to return to the Olympic track stadium for an update on the

men's

100-meter dash.

TRACK COMMENTATOR: Bob, the race started about two seconds ago

and should be

over in about eight more seconds. None of the Americans has fallen

down.

COSTAS: We're going to break away from the men's 100-meter dash

at this

point, but we will be covering it throughout the course of the

evening.

Right now, however, we want you to see this moment, captured by

our NBC

cameras.

(Kerri Strug vaults.)

COSTAS: Now let's head out to the pool to check on the progress of

the

American swimmers, all of whom have overcome asthma.

SWIMMING COMMENTATOR: Bob, here we see an American swimmer

winning a race.

This happened earlier.

COSTAS: How much earlier?

SWIMMING COMMENTATOR: Twenty-four years, Bob. This is Mark

Spitz.

COSTAS: Time for this commercial.

ANNOUNCER: We're the Nike Corporation. We pay famous athletes

millions of

dollars to wear our shoes. Because of this, you, the public, pay

absurdly

high prices for these shoes. Is that stupid, or what? Thank you.

BOM! BOM! BOMBOM BOM BOM BOM!

(Kerri Strug vaults.)

COSTAS: OK, right now there are exciting live gold-medal

competitions going

on in archery, shooting, rowing, kayaking, table tennis, softball,

volleyball, team handball and judo, so right now we're going to take

you to

beach volleyball, recorded earlier today.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL COMMENTATOR: Bob, as you can see, American

Holly McPeak is

bending over.

COSTAS: I'll say.

BOM! BOM! BOMBOM BOM BOM BOM!

(Kerri Strug vaults.)

 

***********************

MAKE HILLS YOUR FRIENDS

***********************

By Woody Green

Many runners feel that hills are the enemy. Folks are always

searching for that FLAT fast course. Heartbreak hill is Boston's

infamous killer landmark. Cuss words often spew forth from runners

mouths as they attempt to climb that dreaded incline in the middle

of their training run.

Hills certainly do slow you down. That thing called gravity makes

sure of that. And, the sad fact is that the laws of physics make it

impossible to gain enough advantage running downhill to make up

for the uphills.

Still, hills should be your friend. Everyone has to run them, so why

not use them to your advantage?

Incorporating hills into your workout is a lot like doing weight

training without need of a gym. By overloading the legs, you actually

gain strength. This is especially true if you run hard uphill repeats.

An example would be to use a 2-600 meter uphill stretch that you

can accelerate up several times with a slow jog back down for rest.

This workout helps you both with strength and leg speed. Just

running a course with rolling terrain on your daily run will help your

strength, too.

Many runners have a habit of getting stuck in a particular rhythm on

their runs. This translates to being a one dimensional runner.

Varying terrain will help you learn to "shift gears" and run well at

different stride rates. That's important when you want to race past

another runner in the last few yards of a race, but it is probably

even more important in maintaining optimal pace in the middle of a

race, regardless of the terrain, weather or competition you might find

out on the course.

For those reasons, hills are really your friend. Don't avoid them, seek

them out! Embrace them, love them, and remember they make you a

better runner!

 

*****************

THIS MONTH'S LIST

*****************

Not a funny list this month, but a list none the less:

*LARGEST AMERICAN ROAD RACES FOR 1995*

1. Bay to Breakers 12 K (San Francisco) - 55,258 participants

2. Lilac Bloomsday 12 K (Spokane) - 54,154

3. Peachtree 10 K (Atlanta) - 50,000

4. Bolder Boulder 10K (Boulder)- 33.075

5. Crescent City Classic 10 K (New Orleans) - 28,500

6. Great Aloha Run 8.2 Mi. (Honolulu) - 28,000

7. Honolulu Marathon (Honolulu) - 27,008

8. New York Marathon - 26,754

9. Race For The Cure 5K (DC) - 18,112

10. Chemical Corporate Challenge 3.5 Mi. (New York) -17,100

Compiled by the Road Running Information Center

*********************

WEB SITES OF INTEREST

*********************

The Sutter Home Napa Valley Marathon is now on the World Wide

Web (http://www.napa-marathon.com). You might want to take a

look.

*****

 

*************

ODDS AND ENDS

*************

*THUGWANE DEATH THREATS*

Josia Thugwane, the recent Olympic gold medalist in the Mens

Marathon, has been receiving death threats. The South African

runner has received thousands of dollars for his Olympic victory, and

now jealous and greedy criminals are want to take his life or his

money.

"Everyone is talking about the plan to kill me," Thugwane said in The

Star newspaper of Johannesburg. "I do not know who these crooks

are, but if they say they will kill someone, they always do."

Thugwane is understandably worried about his family.

Earlier in the year, a gang attempted to steal a car he had won in a

road race. Thugwane was grazed by a bullet in that attempt. He now

has full time security around him, including a personal body guard.

*BRITISH INCENTIVE PLAN*

British officials, displeased with their Olympian medal haul in

Atlanta, are considering a plan that would pay about $320,000 to

athletes winning a gold in Sydney...

 

*****************************

RUNNER'S NICHE IS ON THE WEB!

*****************************

RUNNER'S NICHE has a web page! We have some cool links, and past

issues can be downloaded there. Also, we have a Macintosh training

log program for free download. Features are continuously being

added. If you'd like to visit, the URL is:

http://members.aol.com/woodyg3/web/runiche.html . Pass the

address on to your friends!

********************************

LEGAL STUFF / SUBSCRIPTION INFO.

********************************

"Runner's Niche" is free, but it's contents are copyrighted. Nobody

may use the content without permission of the author and "Runner's

Niche."

SUBSCRIPTION IS FREE. Just write via e-mail to: woodyg3@aol.com.

Include your e-mail address. We'll send you an issue via e-mail

every month or so.

If you don't want to continue receiving "Runner's Niche", simply mail

with your e-mail address and ask that your subscription be stopped.

------------0xKhTmLbOuNdArY Content-Disposition: form-data; name="userfile"; filename=""